thelastgreatkings:

orphan elephant of the ivory trade Bella & abandoned puppy Bubbles are best friends [x]

my day just got 300% better

cakeandrevolution:

cakeandrevolution:

If you’re not upset about Katniss, Tonto, or Kahn being played by white people, but you are upset about Annie being played by a black girl, you’re probably racist.

And by probably I mean definitely.

koikoikoi:

3D Typography by Lex Wilson

Lex Wilson  is a graphic designer and illustrator from Cambridge, UK (currently based in London).

More here →

paulftompkins:

This was quite a journey! I spent the better part of a day going back and forth with a guy that I was not entirely sure was for real at first, then I absolutely got fooled, and then I realized I got fooled. It was fun. And it ended in a way that I felt good about.

It’s pretty much all laid out in the screencaps, But let me elaborate here:

HEY YOUNG MEN! I know it seems like women complain a lot about how they are represented in media, including fiction, and how it seems like they want entertainment tailored specifically to them, and how they seem to want ALL of pop culture to be politically correct or feminist-ized or whatever it is you think they want, but really, what’s happening is that women are tired of seeing garbage women characters in most of our entertainment. And they’re wondering, Would it really be so much trouble to make more realized female characters? You could still have all your CGI and action and science fiction and drama and swords and stuff, but the female characters could be a little more fleshed out and interesting. And the entertainment would still be good and would, in fact, be better.

Guys, instead of  thinking, “Hey, not everything has to be politicized,” try thinking, “I wonder what it would be like for me if the situation were reversed, and how I’d feel if in vast majority of the entertainment I consumed, the male characters were few and far between and then mostly used as talking props & plot devices. I wonder if I’d get kinda tired of that and occasionally I’d say something, even a little joke, just to ease the annoyance a little.”

Fellows. Listen to the women in your lives. Ask them questions. It will change your perspective for the better. Years ago, I got into a brief argument with two female friends of mine about a movie— it does not even matter which movie— that they viewed as sexist and I did not. I couldn;t even fathom how they could see it that way. I tried to argue that it was not sexist. In recounting our discussion to another party, it was pointed out to me that they might have a different viewpoint based on their life experiences, and that it was not for me to tell them that their interpretation was incorrect. And that I was probably getting defensive about it because if the movie was sexist, it followed that my liking it would make me appear sexist. And that’s when I realized that none of this was about me, and maybe I should shut up and listen and try to understand. And also to be more aware of things like this and develop not just my sympathy, but my empathy.

I will only ever be able to empathize so much with women, because my experience as a white male in America is vastly different from that of anyone who is not that. But I can relate to:

  • not being taken seriously
  • not being listened to
  • being dismissed
  • being condescended to
  • having something explained to me that I already understand

And I having had those experiences, I am now more inclined to TRY to understand where someone is coming from if they are telling me they are having a similar experience with our culture.

So guys: just try. You don’t even really have to dig that deep. Think about your own experiences as a person, then apply that to someone else. It gets easier the more you do it, and it makes your life better.

Anyway, I hear Dawn of The Planet of The Apes is pretty good! 

What an inspiration.

fuckyeahlavernecox:

"If you have a problem with people living their lives and being authentically who they are, you really should go and do some soul-searching."

behindbobsburgers:

Tina Belcher was named Best Character of 2014 in the latest issue of Esquire Magazine! Thank you Esquire and way to go, Tina!!! (via bentoboxent)

behindbobsburgers:

Tina Belcher was named Best Character of 2014 in the latest issue of Esquire Magazine! Thank you Esquire and way to go, Tina!!! (via bentoboxent)

If I can’t be at least half as cool as George when I’m older then I just don’t want to age.

daniellarobin:

This show ended way too soon.

daniellarobin:

This show ended way too soon.

laurenheartsmovies:

I marked my calendar for the day Elaine Stritch: Shoot Me came to Netflix streaming. It was never my intention to wait this long to see it, but sadly it was only in the theaters in my town for a couple of weeks. Needless to say, this film was everything an Elaine Stritch fangirl hoped it would be. If you’re a Stritch fan yourself, or even if you just suspect you might be, I implore you to see this film. I know you don’t need them, but here are five good reasons you should watch this ASAP:
She’s incredibly talented. You know this already, I know you do, but I think it’s important every now and again to stop and appreciate talent like her’s. Not only is she a triple threat, but she’s about a half year from 90* and still performing. The least we can do to honor her talent and life-long commitment to the craft is watch this doc.
She’s fascinating. I mean you see her in her fur coat and big glasses and generally think “Well, she’s interesting!” but that really pales in comparison to some of the stories she shares in the film. Her two dates with President Kennedy come to mind…
She’s everything women are taught not to be. Elaine Stritch is loud, speaks her mind, does things the way she wants and is absolutely unabashed about all of it. And she’s incredibly successful. This film serves as an 80-minute reminder that your success and happiness are absolutely not dependent on your ability or willingness to fit yourself into an assigned set of expectations and rules.
It’s honest and raw. It’s a documentary, so you assume it will be honest, but this certainly could have been edited in a “sugar-coated” way. Ms. Stritch is getting old and is dealing with (physical, emotional and mental) issues many people deal with as they age. There are moments in the film where it would have been easy for Chiemi Karasawa to flinch. To stop rolling, to pan the camera away or to edit strategically. She doesn’t. As such you, the viewer, are forced to confront the fact that we’re all heading towards similar fates, regardless of who we are, or the details of our lives.
Elaine Stritch doesn’t wear pants. Bear with me. I’m not saying “see this film to see Elaine Stritch without pants.” I’m saying “This woman has achieved what so many of us see as just a pipedream.” I know there are many (many) people on Tumblr who would love to live in a society where pants were simply an option. This woman has created that society. It is a one-person society and for this I both envy and admire her.
*For clarity, she is nearly 90 now, not at the time of filming.
Image Via.

Reblogging mainly for the last bullet.

laurenheartsmovies:

I marked my calendar for the day Elaine Stritch: Shoot Me came to Netflix streaming. It was never my intention to wait this long to see it, but sadly it was only in the theaters in my town for a couple of weeks. Needless to say, this film was everything an Elaine Stritch fangirl hoped it would be. If you’re a Stritch fan yourself, or even if you just suspect you might be, I implore you to see this film. I know you don’t need them, but here are five good reasons you should watch this ASAP:

  • She’s incredibly talented. You know this already, I know you do, but I think it’s important every now and again to stop and appreciate talent like her’s. Not only is she a triple threat, but she’s about a half year from 90* and still performing. The least we can do to honor her talent and life-long commitment to the craft is watch this doc.
  • She’s fascinating. I mean you see her in her fur coat and big glasses and generally think “Well, she’s interesting!” but that really pales in comparison to some of the stories she shares in the film. Her two dates with President Kennedy come to mind…
  • She’s everything women are taught not to be. Elaine Stritch is loud, speaks her mind, does things the way she wants and is absolutely unabashed about all of it. And she’s incredibly successful. This film serves as an 80-minute reminder that your success and happiness are absolutely not dependent on your ability or willingness to fit yourself into an assigned set of expectations and rules.
  • It’s honest and raw. It’s a documentary, so you assume it will be honest, but this certainly could have been edited in a “sugar-coated” way. Ms. Stritch is getting old and is dealing with (physical, emotional and mental) issues many people deal with as they age. There are moments in the film where it would have been easy for Chiemi Karasawa to flinch. To stop rolling, to pan the camera away or to edit strategically. She doesn’t. As such you, the viewer, are forced to confront the fact that we’re all heading towards similar fates, regardless of who we are, or the details of our lives.
  • Elaine Stritch doesn’t wear pants. Bear with me. I’m not saying “see this film to see Elaine Stritch without pants.” I’m saying “This woman has achieved what so many of us see as just a pipedream.” I know there are many (many) people on Tumblr who would love to live in a society where pants were simply an option. This woman has created that society. It is a one-person society and for this I both envy and admire her.

*For clarity, she is nearly 90 now, not at the time of filming.

Image Via.

Reblogging mainly for the last bullet.